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Are Christians in America Persecuted?

woody:

The short answer is “Yes, all the time.”

The not as short answer is: “Yes, Christians in America are persecuted, but not as frequently, consistently, or with nearly the intensity that Christians are persecuted in many other parts of the world.”

For a longer answer, keep reading.

This paper is deeply flawed - no where in this report on American Christian persecution does it mention that 80% of americans self identify as believing in Abrahams god, nor does it mention that the single most unelectable belief structure in the USA is atheism.

It also tries to use the “biblical” definition of persecution - not a REAL definition of persecution, as in, trying to say “well the bible says we will be persecuted!” is silly. Lets talk about real world examples here, and real world meaning of the word “persecuted” - and btw, if Christians are so persecuted, why does every single major member of the US government publicly pronounce to be christian? why is god on our money, in our pledge of allegiance, in our national anthem, etc, etc, etc (none of these inconvenient truths are mentioned).

I’m curious why you think it odd that Christians would define persecution by what the Bible says. How would you define it? I’m guessing you would define it along the lines of what DeYoung describes as martyrdom.

As to your second point, everything you described is simply a veneer of Christianity, the vestiges of a Christianity-influenced heritage of a culture that is very clearly post-Christian. You really think that because our money says “In God We Trust” that this actually means American contemporary culture isn’t hostile to Christianity? It’s like seeing the homeless guy in a tattered Armani suit but whose shoes still have a slight gleam in them: “Look at that shine! He must be wealthy!”

(Source: sds)

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posted 4 / 16 / 2014
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If John 15:20 is true, and 2 Timothy 3:13 is true, and the expectation of the entire New Testament is true, then no amount of PR work is going to rescue the church from being thought by some as backwards and bigoted. Where in the gospels did Jesus promise that the world would love us if we just kept our heads down and tried to be good neighbors? Where in Revelation is war with the dragon presented as anyone’s fault but the dragon’s? I know many outsiders think of the church as being very “unchristian” and evangelicals as being political operatives for the Republican Party. So let’s have the humility to see if we are as obnoxious and unintelligent as many people surmise. But let’s not assume that bad press with the world means we’ve done wrong by God. This is Holy Week after all, where Jesus was hated by the crowd and abandoned by his own disciples.
Kevin DeYoung - “Are Christians In America Persecuted?”
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posted 4 / 16 / 2014
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Are Christians in America Persecuted?

The short answer is “Yes, all the time.”

The not as short answer is: “Yes, Christians in America are persecuted, but not as frequently, consistently, or with nearly the intensity that Christians are persecuted in many other parts of the world.”

For a longer answer, keep reading.

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posted 4 / 16 / 2014
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Why Is This Issue Different?

christianity:

Kevin DeYoung explains why homosexuality isn’t simply another issue that Christians can agree to disagree on.

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posted 3 / 28 / 2014
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Is Being Gay Sanctifiable?

I continue to enjoy Wesley Hill’s thoughtful and irenic engagement on the intersection of Christianity and human sexuality.

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posted 2 / 26 / 2014
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Bill Nye’s Reasonable Man--The Central Worldview Clash of the Ham-Nye Debate
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posted 2 / 10 / 2014
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Today, Christians who begin to realize they’re gay—or, in a great Onion headline that captures my freshman and sophomore years of college pretty well, “Gay Teen Worried He Might Be Christian”—have options beyond tweezering at their relationships with their fathers and praying for change.

Gay Christians may end up married to the opposite sex, because life and sexuality are complex: Spiritual Friendship has a few married contributors, although none consider themselves “ex-gay.” But most gay Christians who accept the historical teaching are accepting a lifetime of celibacy. We can’t plan on marriage or wait around for it. So we’ve had to be much more intentional about asking how we can give and receive love. To whom can we devote ourselves, and on whom can we rely?

In order to help answer these urgent questions, some churches and individual Christians are rediscovering a broader understanding of “kinship” that goes against a culture in which marriage is the only chosen form of adult kinship we recognize. In the Gospel of Mark, Jesus promises that those who lose their homes or families for His sake will receive new homes and families, “a hundred times more now.”

But the church has rarely deigned to provide that family for its gay members who are estranged from their families of origin, or who suffer from loneliness and lack of purpose because they’re unmarried and unable to pursue marriage. Gay Christians are finding “chosen families” in many different ways. Some live in intentional communities: in my forthcoming book I interview a man who has found that community life offers him the kind of lasting, difficult love that chastens and rewards us. Others look to the nearly forgotten Christian traditions in which friendship was treated as a form of kinship that carried obligations of care.

Eve Tushnet, “Coming Out Christian.” This is the best thing you could read if you want to understand the group I’m talking and writing with these days over at spiritualfriendship.org. (via wesleyhill)
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posted 1 / 29 / 2014
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Now it is true that an atheist can know certain things by means of this natural law, and he can be right about those things. But he is not right about the source of that knowledge, and he is not right about the context of his moral knowledge. If a natural law theorist wants to flatter this atheist, and act like his moral knowledge is a valid bit of knowing, even within his atheistic context, then that natural law theorist, in my view, has given away the store, not to mention the farm, and to switch metaphors a third time, is five thousand dollars down. In other words, nature does not just show us morality, suspended in midair. Natural law delivers the whole package, and the true Creator of it.
Douglas Wilson
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posted 1 / 15 / 2014
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Letters from a Skeptic: A Son Wrestles with His Father's Questions about Christianity (FREE EBOOK)

This book is by far the best “apologetic” I’ve ever read–precisely because it’s not one in the classic sense. It’s personal, pastoral, and passionately exhortative. Greg simply lets his dad’s questions and hang-ups drive the conversation. The result is a transformation.

The Kindle version is currently FREE.

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posted 1 / 13 / 2014
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Why Faith? | RedState
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posted 1 / 6 / 2014
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True & Better | “The Bible is not a series of disconnected stories; it is a single narrative that points to one person. Based on a talk by Tim Keller.”

This is fantastic.

(Source: worshiphousemedia.com)

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posted 1 / 6 / 2014
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Atheist Church Movement Shake Up: Ideological Battle Leads to Secular ‘Denominational’ Chasm | TheBlaze.com

hilker:

See, this is interesting. Atheist churches are finding that many of the problems they had with “religion” and “church” are actually human and community problems.

I’m battling hilarity and sadness. It’s amazing the pitiful but extravagant lengths people will go to deny the Truth but still try and squeeze out existential meaning from life—even such earnest yet shallow imitations as an atheist “church.” Wow.

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posted 1 / 6 / 2014
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Why Switchfoot won’t sing Christian songs | ctkblog

None of these songs has been born again, and to that end there is no such thing as Christian music. No. Christ didn’t come and die for my songs, he came for me. Yes. My songs are a part of my life. But judging from scripture I can only conclude that our God is much more interested in how I treat the poor and the broken and the hungry than the personal pronouns I use when I sing. I am a believer. Many of these songs talk about this belief. An obligation to say this or do that does not sound like the glorious freedom that Christ died to afford me.

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posted 12 / 7 / 2013
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Evangelicals and Obamacare

My sense is that conservative Christian objections to Obamacare in particular, and to the expansion of government in general, are driven not only by the unfortunate policy specifics, but also by more general concerns that are fundamentally and legitimately theological.  More specifically, such opposition is funded by real if often inchoate convictions about theological anthropology, theology proper, and ecclesiology.

First, there is the undeniable fact that the expansion of the welfare state undermines individual responsibility. Christian conservatives know from Scripture and experience that human beings generally behave self-centeredly and tend to prioritize short-term gratification unless there are normative and institutional structures in place that provide discipline and incentive to do otherwise.  Moreover, conservatives know from experience and common sense that when government subsidizes behavior the nation gets more of that behavior.  It was precisely this recognition that lay at the heart of the successful welfare reform in the 1990s.

Second, there is the problem of secular, statist idolatry.   The modern welfare state is the Leviathan that puts itself in the place of God as that which meets cradle-to-the-grave needs of people. In fact, there is now a host of sociological evidence indicating that the decline of Christianity in the West can be correlated rather precisely with the expansion of government.

Third, there is the fact that the “therapeutocracy” (to use social theorist Jürgen Habermas’s memorable term) of the modern welfare state has little tolerance for faith perspectives that oppose its edicts or compete with it for the allegiance of the populace.  Thus it seeks to undercut the mediating structures (churches and voluntary societies) that Tocqueville so eloquently recognized as essential to the preservation of genuine democracy.  How else are we to understand the way that the Obama administration has persistently been picking unnecessary fights with people of faith, whether it be the efforts to marginalize Christians in the military, the bizarre arguments of the Obama administration in a recent court case (Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church and School v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) that the free-exercise clause First Amendment does not protect a religious organization’s right to choose its own leaders, or the contraceptive mandate of Obamacare?

I’ll agree that we need to have a good and substantive discussion about healthcare reform.  But sentimental soundbites from the Evangelical left about “care for the poor” do not contribute much to that endeavor.

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posted 11 / 27 / 2013
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In 2012 Douglas Wilson gave a two-part lecture series at the of Indiana University about what the Bible says about human sexuality, followed by a Q&A. Watch the whole thing at http://www.canonwired.com/bloomington

Removing the heart—“that’s what conversion is.”

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posted 9 / 14 / 2013
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